Why is Miss Emily viewed as a tradition a duty and a care?

Why is Miss Emily viewed as a tradition a duty and a care?

Although Emily once represented a great southern tradition centering on the landed gentry with their vast holdings and considerable resources, Emily’s legacy has devolved, making her more a duty and an obligation than a romanticized vestige of a dying order.

What does the description of Emily as a tradition a duty and a care a sort of hereditary obligation upon the town mean?

Now also in section one we have this line: “Alive, Miss Emily had been a tradition, a duty, and a care; a sort of hereditary obligation upon the town…” So she’s a duty, she’s an old woman you have to make allowances for, but she’s also a care, which means that she is a bit of a burden, and we’ll see why.

Why is Miss Emily a tradition?

Emily then is described as “a tradition, a duty, and a care; a sort of hereditary obligation upon the town”. (Faulkner 681) This meaning that the townspeople viewed her as more of a monument to the town that has been there for as long as they can remember and won’t be moved.

How does Emily represent the tradition of the South?

Emily clings to the notion of what once was, becoming a traditional obligation to the town of Jefferson through her refusal to pay taxes. Finally, she is representative of the South through her unwillingness to accept the passage of time as she keeps the bodies of both her father and Homer Barron after their deaths.

What is the significance of sidewalks in A Rose for Emily?

The sidewalks in “A Rose for Emily” may signify, first and foremost, moving toward the future, as well as the advent of change.

What are the traditions in A Rose for Emily?

Tradition is shown when the older generation of people put lime down instead of confronting Emily with the smell. The elders of the town also allowed Emily to go without paying taxes after she told them she did not have to pay them. Finally, tradition is shown with Emily cutting her hair.

What is a fallen woman A Rose for Emily?

A person who has toppled from the pedestal is a kind of fallen monument. Miss Emily is likely to think of herself as still on the pedestal, or, even if she does not, the habits of generations of her family and the influence of a clearly dominating father keep her firmly fixed on the pedestal in her own mind.

Why did they wait until after the funeral to open the closed room in A Rose for Emily?

Most religions observe a period of mourning for the dead, and discovering what was behind the bedroom door was primarily a matter of curiosity, so it is not too surprising that in order to appear properly pious “They waited until Miss Emily was decently in the ground before they opened it.” The delay is just one of the …

What is the tradition in A Rose for Emily?

Why was Emily a hereditary obligation?

As this story begins, we learn that Miss Emily did not have to pay taxes to the town in which she lived, and this is the “hereditary obligation” (1) that the town undertook. It is possible that Colonel Sartoris felt an obligation to Miss Emily because her father had done some things for the town.

Why does the town tolerate Miss Emily?

Even after Miss Emily’s father dies and Miss Emily comes to think of herself as being socially better than her poverty would justify, the townspeople nonetheless tolerate her haughtiness because she is a living monument to their glorified past, just as significant to them in this respect as the Grierson family house …

Where does the quote from a rose for Emily come from?

1. Alive, Miss Emily had been a tradition, a duty, and a care; a sort of hereditary obligation upon the town . . . This quotation appears near the beginning of the story, in section I, when the narrator describes Emily’s funeral and history in the town. The complex figure of Emily Grierson casts a long shadow in the town of Jefferson.

What was Southern tradition in a rose for Emily?

Its dilapidated, dusty nature suggests that Southern tradition has fallen into irredeemable disrepair. ”A Rose for Emily” begins with a disagreement between Emily and some Jefferson city officials. These officials arrive at Emily’s house to collect taxes that she has never paid.

How does the narrator Define Miss Emily’s position in Jefferson?

The narrator defines Emily’s position in Jefferson: ”Miss Emily had been a tradition, a duty, and a care; a sort of hereditary obligation upon the town.” In her old age, however, she overstays her welcome. The new Jefferson of progress no longer accepts her as a necessary obligation.

What does the Grierson family represent in the Rose for Emily?

The Grierson family and their home are relics from the past and represent the decaying Southern aristocracy. Emily clings to the notion of what once was, becoming a traditional obligation to the town of Jefferson through her refusal to pay taxes.