Why does Scrooge say Are there no prisons are there no workhouses?

Why does Scrooge say Are there no prisons are there no workhouses?

19 Are there no prisons? Scrooge suggests that the poor go to the Union workhouses, or to the Treadmill, or that they be taken care of by the Poor Law.

Are there no workhouses Scrooge?

“Have they no refuge or resource?” cried Scrooge. “Are there no prisons?” said the Spirit, turning on him for the last time with his own words. “Are there no workhouses?” Note that Ignorance is worse than Want.

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Are there no prisons are there no workhouses let them die and decrease the surplus population?

Scrooge-“Are there no prisons?” Scrooge-“And the Union workhouses.” . Scrooge- “If they would rather die,” “they had better do it, and decrease the surplus population.”

Are there no prisons are there no workhouses Ghost of Christmas Present?

Scrooge inquires if nothing can be done to help them. Mockingly, the ghost quotes Scrooge’s earlier retort, “Are there no prisons? Are there no workhouses ?” The spirit disappears as the clock strikes midnight and Scrooge eyes a hooded phantom coming toward him.

What was Jacob Marley weighed down by?

In the first stave (or chapter) of A Christmas Carol, we meet Marley, Scrooge’s deceased business partner, who is encased in heavy chains. These chains are made of steel and are weighed down with “cash-boxes, keys, padlocks, ledgers, deeds, and heavy purses.”

What are workhouses in Christmas carol?

Dickens describes them as portly to show their affluence and success, not their weight. They were probably large and heavy in a dignified and stately way. Given that few people in those days had enough to eat, today we would probably describe them as well fed or robust. Dickens describes them as pleasant to behold.

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Who says Are there no workhouses?

When the Ghost of Christmas Present says these words to Scrooge in stave 3, he is actually quoting Scrooge himself from earlier in the novel, in stave 1. When the two gentlemen came to Scrooge’s counting house to collect money for charity, he asked them, Are there no prisons? …

What does Scrooge say must happen to the people who do not want to go to the workhouses?

What he means by this is pretty nasty — he means that the poor people should just go off and die. ‘If they would rather die,’ said Scrooge, ‘they had better do it, and decrease the surplus population. He says this in the first stave of the story.

What happened in the workhouses?

The harsh system of the workhouse became synonymous with the Victorian era, an institution which became known for its terrible conditions, forced child labour, long hours, malnutrition, beatings and neglect.

What does Scrooge say about workhouses?

Scrooge,” said the [one of the gentlemen], taking up a pen, “it is more than usually desirable that we should make some slight provision for the Poor and destitute, who suffer greatly at the present time.

Why does Scrooge refuse to give the poor a donation?

Scrooge refuses to give them a donation, claiming that the prisons and workhouses should provide for such people. He declares that if they cannot go to prison or the workhouses the poor should die ‘and decrease the surplus population’.

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What did Scrooge do for the poor in A Christmas Carol?

He supported the Poor Law to create workhouses for the poor, as people who were unable to sustain themselves did not have the right to live. In the fevered haunting of the second night, Scrooge and the Ghost of Christmas Present visit the holiday celebration of Bob Cratchit, with its tiny pudding to serve a family of seven.

What did Scrooge say about treadmill and poor law?

“The Treadmill and the Poor Law are in full vigour, then?” said Scrooge. “Both very busy, sir.” “Oh! I was afraid, from what you said at first, that something had occurred to stop them in their useful course,” said Scrooge.

What does Scrooge say to the two gentlemen?

Scrooge responds with a grumpy ‘Bah!’ followed by ‘Humbug!’ Two gentlemen enter the office as Scrooge’s nephew leaves. They are collecting for the poor and homeless. Scrooge refuses to give them a donation, claiming that the prisons and workhouses should provide for such people.