Why does Gene return to Devon school at the beginning of the book?

Why does Gene return to Devon school at the beginning of the book?

Gene returns to his school to relive the events that occurred there, beginning in the summer of 1942, that culminated in Finny’s death.

What does gene do to help Finny when he returns from school?

Finny playfully criticizes Gene’s clothes and grumbles about the lack of maid service. Gene responds that it is no great loss, considering the war, and he makes up Finny’s bed for him. Gene now tells Brinker, to Finny’s obvious relief, that he no longer wants to enlist. …

Why does Gene jump from the tree?

Finny says he has to “shame” Gene into taking risks. It is clear, however, that the real reason Gene jumps is because he feels competitive with Finny. He wants to keep up with his friend and prove he can be his equal. He is rewarded for his risk, because none of the other boys will take the leap into the water.

What two places does Gene visit when he returns to school?

Plot summary. Gene Forrester returns to his old prep school, Devon (a thinly veiled portrayal of Knowles’s alma mater, Phillips Exeter Academy), fifteen years after he graduated, to visit two places he regards as “fearful sites:” a flight of marble stairs and a big tree by the river.

What helps gene get over his fear of jumping off the tree?

5 of 5 What helps Gene get over his fear of jumping off the tree?

  • A pep talk.
  • A good luck charm.
  • Finny’s fall.
  • Cheers from the audience.

    Why does Gene continue to jump from the tree even though he doesn’t want to?

    Gene reflects on his jumps from the tree into the river below. He’s terrified, but as Finny goads him on, he manages to ignore the terror and perform the dangerous stunt. He continues to jump because he feels deeply competitive with Finny, a fact he hides from everyone else, including Finny.

    What two places does Gene visit when he returns to his school?

    What two things did Gene return?

    Expert Answers Gene does this by facing the two fearful sites of his past, one of which is the tree, “weary from age, enfeebled, dry.” And, Gene realizes that “Nothing endures, not a tree, not love, not even a death by violence.” Gene is “changed” after seeing this tree from which his rival, Phineas fell.