Why does Finny want to train Gene for the Olympics?

Why does Finny want to train Gene for the Olympics?

Finny tells Gene that he wanted to be an Olympic athlete and that now he will have to train Gene to go in his place. Finny convinces Gene to undertake the training despite his objections that the war will preempt the Olympics in 1944.

What sport does Finny train Gene for the Olympics?

He finds transcendence in the act of running. When he’s done all his laps, Gene is “not even winded.” Finny recognizes that Gene found his rhythm. When the boys meet Mr. Ludsbury, Finny tells him that Gene is training for the 1944 Olympics.

Why is Finny surprised that Gene wants to study?

Finny says that he didn’t realize that Gene ever had to study; he thought his academic prowess came naturally. He expresses admiration for Gene’s intelligence and says that he is right to be so serious about something at which he excels.

Why did Finny want to be an Olympic athlete?

Finny tells Gene that he wanted to be an Olympic athlete and that now he will have to train Gene to go in his place. Finny convinces Gene to undertake the training despite his objections that the war will preempt the Olympics in 1944. Finny begins to train Gene and Gene tutors Finny in his classes; they are both surprised by their progress.

Why does Finny feel left out in a separate peace?

The war makes Finny feels left out due to his injury. Finny wants to train Gene to compete in the 1944 Olympics. He tells Gene that since he (Finny) can no longer compete, Gene has to do it for him. In this way, Finny can live vicariously through Gene even with his (Finny’s) injury. Having a war going on gets in the way of this plan.

Why did Finny invite Gene to the 1944 Olympics?

Finny’s 1944 Olympics, then, represents an anti-war, a reality that must be accepted in light of the fake war. When Finny invites Gene to train for the Olympics in his place, he invites him, in essence, to join him in a new world — to become, in fact, a part of him.

What happens to Finny and Gene after the war?

The boys join together again, but the weeks apart have clearly changed them. Gene has become overly serious — even sanctimonious — about the hardships of wartime, while Finny’s frame of mind, his expectations about daily life, remain firmly fixed in peace.