What is the most important lesson that Scrooge has learned from his travels with the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come?

What is the most important lesson that Scrooge has learned from his travels with the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come?

In Stave 4, Scrooge learns the truth about the value of his life as it applies to other people. What he comes to see through the lessons of the final spirit, the Ghost of Christmas Yet To Come, is that when the final tally is taken, his life, in the eyes of his fellow man, will be worth nothing.

What does Scrooge learn about the past?

From the first ghost, the Ghost of Christmas Past, Scrooge learns that the simple things in life like love, friendship, and laughter hold value.

What did Scrooge specifically learn from each of the 3 spirits?

Scrooge learns that if he does not change he will be the miserable man in the casket who no one loves or cares about. Overall the three spirits teach Scrooge to be a better man. Scrooge’s attitude toward Christmas has changed and he is happy that he has the opportunity to show others how he has changed.

What do ignorance and want represent?

Dickens uses two wretched children, called Ignorance and Want, to represent the poor. a stale and shrivelled hand, like that of age, had pinched, and twisted them, and pulled them into shreds. The Ghost tells Scrooge that the children are the responsibility of all mankind.

Are these the shadows of what will be?

Are these the shadows of the things that Will be, or are they shadows of the things that May be only?” Still the Ghost pointed downward to the grave by which it stood. “Men’s courses will foreshadow certain ends, to which, if persevered in, they must lead,” said Scrooge.

What does Scrooge do to show he’s a changed man?

Not only is Scrooge buying the goose for his clerk’s family, he is arranging to do it anonymously. These events alone show a marked difference from the man he was in Staves 1-4. Scrooge traverses the streets, exchanging pleasantries with strangers, and encounters the charity collector from Stave 1.

What does Scrooge’s change represent?

Ebenezer Scrooge represents a couple of things at the end of the story, change and hope. He represents change because he has so completely transformed throughout the course of the story. At the beginning he was a lonely, angry, greedy man who cared for no one.

How do the spirits change Scrooge?

In Scrooge we see a man who is transformed from a greedy, selfish miser into a generous and good-natured character by the end. He is shown the error of his ways by the ghosts that visit him and is redeemed by his own willingness to change.

How does Ignorance and Want change Scrooge?

While Fan and Fezziwig help Scrooge to see the effects of generosity, Ignorance and Want force Scrooge to confront his own worldview in a way that he has never had to. The effects of this encounter terrify Scrooge, and his terror continues through the final part of his journey with the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come.

Are these the shadows?

Are these the shadows of the things that Will be, or are they shadows of things that May be, only?” Still the Ghost pointed downward to the grave by which it stood. “Men’s courses will foreshadow certain ends, to which, if persevered in, they must lead,” said Scrooge.

What four actions does Scrooge make to indicate that he is a changed man?

What does Scrooge scream when he realizes he is saved?

Upon realizing he has been returned to Christmas morning, Scrooge begins shouting “Merry Christmas!” at the top of his lungs.