What is the moral of A Tale of Two Cities and explain the significance of two cities?

What is the moral of A Tale of Two Cities and explain the significance of two cities?

With A Tale of Two Cities, Dickens asserts his belief in the possibility of resurrection and transformation, both on a personal level and on a societal level. The narrative suggests that Sydney Carton’s death secures a new, peaceful life for Lucie Manette, Charles Darnay, and even Carton himself.

What are the three specific settings that A Tale of Two Cities is concerned with?

As the title indicates, the novel’s action is split between two geographic settings, London and Paris. The novel is critical of both cities in different ways: London (and England more generally) is presented as somewhat old-fashioned, conservative, and out of step with the times.

Who is the most important character in a tale of two cities?

Charles Darnay is the protagonist of the novel. He incites several of the major plotlines after his first trial where he is accused of treason against England. His trial brings him into contact with Lucie, Dr. Manette, and Sydney Carton, triggering all of the further plot action to come.

How is resurrection a theme in A Tale of Two Cities?

And Christianity, the predominant religion in the Western world, is built on belief in the resurrection of Jesus Christ. In A Tale of Two Cities, Charles Dickens’ 1859 novel about the French Revolution, resurrection is a common theme, though no characters are literally brought back from the dead.

What is the main conflict of A Tale of Two Cities?

A Tale of Two Cities is structured around a central conflict between Charles Darnay’s desire to break free of his family legacy, and Madame Defarge’s desire to hold him accountable for the violent actions of his father and uncle.

How is sacrifice shown in A Tale of Two Cities?

A Tale of Two Cities is full of examples of sacrifice, on both a personal and national level. Charles sacrifices his family wealth and heritage in order to live a life free of guilt for his family’s awful behavior. The French people are willing to sacrifice their own lives to free themselves from tyranny.