What is the famous first line of A Tale of Two Cities?

What is the famous first line of A Tale of Two Cities?

The famous opening lines from Charles Dickens’ seminal novel on the French Revolution: “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it …

What is an example of a mythological allusion?

Achilles heel: In Greek mythology, the warrior Achilles was made invulnerable as a baby by being dipped into the River Styx. Argus-eyed: According to the Greek legend, Argus had 100 eyes. The Greek queen Juno had him spy on her wayward husband, Zeus.

What is the difference between a literary and mythological allusion?

What is the difference between a literary and mythological allusion? A literary allusion refers to a specific text, but a mythological allusion can be a reference to something in the oral tradition.

What is an example of an allusion in Romeo and Juliet?

One example of an allusion in Romeo and Juliet is the reference in act 1, scene 4 to Queen Mab, the Queen of the fairies in Celtic folklore. Another example can be found in act 3, scene 2, when Juliet refers to Phaethon, who in Greek mythology is the son of the sun god, Helios.

Who was killed by the guillotine in A Tale of Two Cities?

The seamstress is an unnamed twenty-year-old woman featured as a desperately poor peasant accused of plotting against the French Republic by Robespierre’s Committee of Public Safety during the Terror of the French Revolution in 1793. Found guilty of this imaginary crime, she was condemned to death by beheading.

Are there any biblical allusions in A Tale of Two Cities?

In keeping with many Victorian writers, Dickens frequently employs biblical allusions in the novel. He is especially interested in the downsides of Enlightenment values, such as reason and logic over faith or religion.

What was Dickens alluding to in A Tale of Two Cities?

Dickens may be alluding to the biblical book of Ecclesiastes 3, which describes each “season,” such as sorrow and happiness, that one might encounter in life. Each of these seasons serves a “purpose under heaven”—a statement that reinforces the theme of predestination that runs through the entire novel.

Where does the word loadstone come from in A Tale of Two Cities?

The word “loadstone” refers to a magnet made of the magnetic oxide of iron. In marine navigation, loadstone rocks were used as compasses. Here, Dickens alludes to “The Third Calendar’s Tale” from Arabian Nights, a story which follows Ajib as his ship sinks when it crashes into a loadstone rock.