What does Scrooge see on his door knocker when he returns home from work?

What does Scrooge see on his door knocker when he returns home from work?

What happened to the door knocker when Scrooge was opening the door? It changed into Marley’s face. What appeared to Scrooge AND what did he tell Scrooge? The ghost of Jacob Marley.

What happened to the door knocker at Scrooge’s house that caused him to be startled?

A little while later, every bell in the house begins to ring of its own accord. This unceasing ringing is soon replaced by the terrible sound of clanging chains from the cellar. Scrooge becomes palpably nervous when the dragging chains are heard climbing up the stairs towards his door.

What appears in the door knocker to Scrooge from A Christmas Carol?

Scrooge notes that the horrible specter of Marley’s face rested on its otherworldly nature, not on its expression. Marley’s face unsettles Scrooge for a moment, but the knocker soon appears. Before he shuts the door behind him, Scrooge looks cautiously beyond the doorway.

What does Marley look like in the door knocker?

The expression on this disembodied face is neither angry nor violent; it looks just as Marley was apt to look when he was alive. Scrooge notes that the horrible specter of Marley’s face rested on its otherworldly nature, not on its expression. Marley’s face unsettles Scrooge for a moment, but the knocker soon appears.

What did Scrooge look like in the yard?

“It was not in impenetrable shadow as the other objects in the yard were, but had a dismal light about it, like a bad lobster in a dark cellar. It was not angry or ferocious, but looked at Scrooge as Marley used to look: with ghostly spectacles turned up on its ghostly forehead. . .

Where does Ebenezer Scrooge live in A Christmas Carol?

In Stave I of Charles Dickens ’ A Christmas Carol, titled “Marley’s Ghost,” Ebenezer Scrooge is returning to his home, a nondescript old building formerly occupied by his now-deceased business partner, Jacob Marley, that barely registered in its bland neighborhood and inside of which was a “gloomy suite of rooms,” as described by Dickens’ narrator.