What are the opening lines to A Tale of Two Cities?

What are the opening lines to A Tale of Two Cities?

The famous opening lines from Charles Dickens’ seminal novel on the French Revolution: “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it …

Does A Tale of Two Cities get better?

The book is smooth moving at first, but once it gets going its worth it. If you’re 60 pages in then you’re already a fair bit into the book, I believe. I would highly suggest it. Dickens has a wonderful style, and “A Tale of Two Cities” is full of characters that I was able to really enjoy.

What was the opening line of A Tale of Two Cities?

A Tale of Two Cities: not just a great opening line, also a great opening paragraph. Even people with only the most cursory knowledge of the writings of Charles Dickens usually know about the fantastic start to A Tale of Two Cities: “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times”.

Why is A Tale of Two Cities good?

Because, while A Tale of Two Cities is masterfully written with sly humor, densely meaningful descriptions, a cast of quirky characters only Dickens could create, an endless series of telling binaries and foils, and relevant social commentary about the French Revolution as well as Dickens’ time, it is also simply a damn good story.

Who are the protectors in A Tale of Two Cities?

Mr. Lorry and Miss Pross are reliable protectors. Charles Darnay gives up wealth and station out of his own sense of fairness. And Sydney Carton is the soul of loving sacrifice. Most of the violence in A Tale of Two Cities is portrayed quite lyrically, but there is quite a bit of it.

What do the echoing footsteps in A Tale of Two Cities represent?

A juxtaposition of the scene of the wine spilling in Saint Antoine in Book the First, Chapter V, with that of the monseigneur having his morining chocolate in Book the Second, Chapter VII,… What do the echoing footsteps in Chapter 21 of A Tale of Two cities represent?