What are some metaphors in A Christmas Carol?

What are some metaphors in A Christmas Carol?

Each of the ghosts is a type of metaphor. The Ghost of Christmas Past is a metaphor for the memories that shape our character, while the Ghost of Christmas Present is a metaphor for generosity and joy. The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come is a metaphor for death and the legacy of our lives that we leave for others.

What are some examples of figurative language in A Christmas Carol?

Terms in this set (26)

  • Old Marley was as dead as a door nail.
  • Oh!
  • A squeezing wrenching graphing scraping clutching covetous old sinner.
  • Even the blinds men’s dogs would wag their tails as though they said no eye at all is better than an evil eye dark master.
  • It was bleak biting weather.

    How is Scrooge presented in stave 2?

    Scrooge’s materialistic tendencies are presented primarily through the contrast of his pleasant remembrances of Fezziwig’s small party and his later broken engagement with Belle. After all, it couldn’t have cost more than a few pounds–and Scrooge has already proven himself fond of wealth.

    Is another idol has displaced me a metaphor?

    Belle speaks first: “Another idol has displaced me; and it can cheer and comfort you in time to come as I would have tried to do, I have no just cause to grieve.” “What idol has replaced you?” he rejoined. The “golden idol” is a metaphor for wealth.

    WHAT IS A frosty rime mean?

    rime noun (FROST) [ C or U ] mainly literary. frost (= the thin, white layer of ice that forms when the air temperature is below the freezing point of water, especially outside at night): There was a strong rime on all vegetation. The windows were wet where the rime had melted.

    What does a poor excuse for picking a man’s pocket every twenty fifth of December?

    “And yet,” said Scrooge, “you don’t think me ill-used, when I pay a day’s wages for no work.” “A poor excuse for picking a man’s pocket every twenty-fifth of December!” said Scrooge, buttoning his great-coat to the chin. “But I suppose you must have the whole day. Be here all the earlier next morning.”

    What was wrapped around Marley’s ghost?

    Marley’s chains contain ledgers and cash boxes, indicating the specific ways in which he is guilty of failing humanity; likewise, the ghost here has a chain containing a huge iron safe, which probably indicates that he failed his fellows by hoarding his money rather than helping those in need (like Scrooge, which …

    What happens in chapter 2 of A Christmas Carol?

    Touched by these memories, Scrooge begins to sob. The ghost takes the weeping man into the school where a solitary boy–a young Ebenezer Scrooge–passes the Christmas holiday all alone. The ghost takes Scrooge on a depressing tour of more Christmases of the past–the boy in the schoolhouse grows older.

    Scrooge is shown as materialistic throughout this stave primarily by his decision to allow his true love, Belle, to leave him because he was unwilling to give up on his pursuit of wealth. He was in love with a young woman named Belle who was sweet and pretty but had no money.

    What characters are in stave 2 of A Christmas Carol?

    Ebenezer Scrooge.

  • The Ghost of Christmas Past.
  • The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come.
  • Bob Cratchit.
  • Tiny Tim.
  • Jacob Marley.
  • Fan.
  • rime noun (FROST) frost (= the thin, white layer of ice that forms when the air temperature is below the freezing point of water, especially outside at night): A frosty rime was on his head, and on his eyebrows.

    What are the metaphors in A Christmas Carol?

    The most dominant metaphors in A Christmas Carol are the three spirits who visit Scrooge. The Ghost of Christmas Past is a personification of memory. In order for Scrooge to grow as a human being, he must remember his past and learn both positive and negative lessons from it.

    What are the events in A Christmas Carol Stave 2?

    A Christmas Carol- Stave 2 1 Key events 1.1 The ghost of Christmas Past appears to Scrooge. 1.2 The ghost takes Scrooge to the village where he grew up, and Scrooge sees his younger self at school, where he’s spending Christmas alone.

    Is the ghost of Christmas yet to come a metaphor?

    The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come is a metaphor for death and the legacy of our lives that we leave for others. The title’s use of the word ‘carol’ and the references to music throughout the story are metaphors for joy throughout the seasons of our lives.

    What does Scrooge say to the Ghost in A Christmas Carol?

    Scrooge’s past, in particular. Scrooge gets an urge to shy away from the ghost’s light and begs him to disappear, but the ghost insists that it is Scrooge’s own fault that he is here. Scrooge apologizes for offending the ghost and asks what he wants. The ghost says he has come to help him.

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