Does Cratchit feel sorry for Scrooge?

Does Cratchit feel sorry for Scrooge?

In the novella While Cratchit’s family curses Scrooge for his stinginess, however, Cratchit says he feels sorry for his employer, and insists that they toast his health. After Scrooge changes his ways on Christmas Day, he anonymously sends a Christmas goose to Cratchit for his family’s dinner.

What is Fred’s attitude towards Scrooge?

Fred remains good-natured, telling Scrooge that even if Christmas never made him any money he still feels it has done him good. His speech irritates Scrooge. “Don’t be angry, uncle.

What is Fred’s opinion of his Uncle Scrooge?

Fred refuses to let Scrooge’s miserly attitude dampen his sprits. “I mean to give him the same chance every year, whether he likes it or not, for I pity him.” He shows his care for his uncle by pledging to continue visiting Scrooge regardless. His concern is revealed by his persistence and pity.

Who does Scrooge meet that makes him feel sad?

While the text does not say directly that Scrooge is sad about Fred, the ghost shows Scrooge a scene of his younger sister Fan coming to take him home forever from his hated boarding school. It is Christmas time and the brother and sister are delighted to see each other. We learn that Fan is “delicate” and dies young.

Why is Scrooge guilty?

In A Christmas Carol, Scrooge is filled with guilt, remorse, and shame for his actions after witnessing the children Ignorance and Want and listening to the Ghost of Christmas Present. He probably remembers all the times he denied charity, refused to donate to the poor, and dismissed those in need.

miserly attitude
Fred refuses to let Scrooge’s miserly attitude dampen his sprits. “I mean to give him the same chance every year, whether he likes it or not, for I pity him.” He shows his care for his uncle by pledging to continue visiting Scrooge regardless. His concern is revealed by his persistence and pity.

Where do we feel sympathy for Scrooge?

Scrooge meets the Ghost of Christmas Present. In the novella ‘A Christmas Carol’, Dickens creates sympathy for Scrooge by showing the reader who he used to be, who he could have been, and how people really feel about him.

Why do we feel sympathy for Scrooge?

In the novella ‘A Christmas Carol’, Dickens creates sympathy for Scrooge by showing the reader who he used to be, who he could have been, and how people really feel about him. Scrooge tries to justify his change in personality by explaining how the money he earns will keep them out of poverty, leading to happiness.

Why do we feel sorry for Scrooge in stave 2?

Overall Sympathy is created throughout the second Stave in the book through the interaction between Scrooge and the other characters from his past as he realises that he could have done things much differently and possibly changed his outlook on life in general for the better.

Why is Scrooge afraid of the ghost of Christmas present?

This might remind you of the little child Ignorance that stepped out from under the Ghost of Christmas Present’s robe – Scrooge is, in a sense, protecting himself with his ignorance. But he is also hurting both himself and the world. Scrooge realizes the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come is looking at him again, and feels a new surge of terror.

Why did Scrooge give Cratchit the day off?

Scrooge begrudingly gives him the day off, but not without a lecture and not without an attempt of making Cratchit feel guilty for, as Scrooge says, taking Christmas day off with pay is like “picking a man’s pocket every twenty-fifth of December.”

What does Fred tell Scrooge about his uncle?

Fred has the wisdom to see past his uncle’s prickly exterior and realize this. In addition, he openly says that he pities Scrooge and that he means to stubbornly invite him to share their Christmas repast with him every single year, no matter how rude and offensive he may be, as he sees the truth of the situation…

What does the narrator say to Scrooge about death?

The narrator recites a lesson about death—that the good-natured body cannot suffer from death and will instead “sow the world with life immortal.” This lesson is what Scrooge hears in his mind when he looks at the body, and imagines the wicked thoughts that have led him to being rich and not good. He considers the awful prospect of dying alone.